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THIS POST is meant to be a supplement to Arran Q Henderson’s post ‘From Sea to Shining Sea: a picture walk on Howth Head’ on the ‘Arran Q Henderson’ blog on 5 March 2013 (arranqhenderson.com). Arran’s ‘Sea to Shining Sea’ post, which I’ve reblogged as my previous post, is meant as ‘part 3’ in my ‘Summer in Dublin’ series. Arran’s camera gave out just as he was approaching the Bailey Lighthouse, and so I thought I’d do the walk and supply the missing pics, which I offer as ‘Summer in Dublin, part 4’.

DART (railway) station in Howth, north county Dublin

DART (railway) station in Howth, north county Dublin

Going around the peninsula anti-clockwise, Arran started off his walk near St Fintan’s church. I however came by way of train (the DART service) and so started my journey back in the village of Howth and walked (westwards) about 2 or 3 kilometres before I got to where Arran started.

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The following few photos are pictures I took on the journey between the railway station and St Fintan’s, which ought to give you a sense of the kind of neighbourhood we’re dealing with here

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The shrinkwrapped boat is nearly bigger than the dwelling house!

The plastic-wrapped boat is nearly bigger than the dwelling house!

Presbyterian church in Howth with (what is presumably) its associated rectory

Presbyterian church in Howth with (what is presumably) its associated rectory

Another shot of (what is presumably) the rectory attached to the Presbyterian church in Howth

Another shot of (what is presumably) the rectory attached to the Presbyterian church in Howth

Wonderful looking place on the other side of the railway tracks (notice the car on the left: modern architecture and vintage cars). I could have had a DART train going past in the foreground but I fumbled and missed the shot. Damn, Blast and bugger!

Wonderful looking place on the other side of the railway tracks (notice the car on the left: modern architecture and vintage cars). I could have had a DART train going past in the foreground but I fumbled and missed the shot. Damn, Blast and bugger!

OK, so shortly after this we come to Church Road; there’s a Methodist church on the corner where you turn down into Church Road (too dull-looking to photo), at the end of which is St Fintan’s whereat you turn left and head over towards the Sutton Dingy Sailing Club. From here on, until we get to the Bailey Lighthouse, let Arran be your main guide (see my previous post, which is a reblog of Arran’s post), however, here are a few pics I took walking along that same stretch of coastline

This is a modern piece by an artist whose name I did not record which commemorates the first settlers on Howth (nice idea and nice piece)

This is a modern piece by an artist whose name I did not record which commemorates the first settlers on Howth (nice idea and nice piece)

Me attempting to take a 'selfie' using one of those rounded mirrors people have across the road from their driveways (this is the only one in which I do not look like a lune or a fatty)

Me attempting to take a ‘selfie’ using one of those rounded mirrors people have across the road from their driveways (this is the only picture in which I do not look like a loon or a fatty)

What I admire about this house is the way they have got so much glass into the place with trashing the integrity of the original structure

I admire the way they got so much glass into this place without absolutely trashing the integrity of the thing

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If this doesn't say "Fuck off" to you then you simply are not paying attention (this, I suppose, is the clubhouse for Howth Golf Club)

If this doesn’t say “Fuck off” to you then you simply aren’t paying attention (this, I believe, is the clubhouse for Howth Golf Club)

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See what I'm talking about?

See what I’m talking about?

And here we are at the Bailey

And here we are at the Bailey

Actually, I didn’t enjoy the section after the Bailey Lighthouse as much as the section essayed in Arran’s post. Perhaps it was because having read and re-read Arran’s post a number of times I felt like I was ‘in the know’ and I was enjoying identifying the places and features he’d photographed and written about, or perhaps it was because a huge section of the area after the Bailey was gorse-burned by gobshites, which still smouldering really stank like blazes, or maybe it was because I was getting a little tired—the walk was a good bit more than I’d bargained for (you need to have proper walking boots for this walk, I did not and the stony conditions underfoot were beginning to tell)—but, in fact, I think it’s because the walk itself is simply not as interesting: unless, of course, you like wild rocky empty wilderness type walking, but, coming from the west end of west Cork as I do, that for me is a busman’s holiday, and I much prefer peeping into the coiffured strongholds of the seriously well-to-do (and Howth is a sanctuary for such exotics). Nevertheless, these be the pics wot I took in the post-Bailey stretch of the walk . . .

The Hollyhead ferry just about to enter the Dublin Bay area (in the background can be seen the most easterly tip of the Wicklow mountains)

The Hollyhead ferry just about to enter the Dublin Bay area (in the background can be seen the most easterly tip of the Wicklow mountains)

Really lovely-looking place on top of the hill of Howth (classy)

Really lovely-looking place on top of the hill of Howth (classy)

I thought this kind of crap happened only in West Cork

I thought this kind of crap happened only in West Cork!
Wrong again, Bob!

Almost there: this is coming up to the northeast corner of Howth's peninsula

Almost there: this is coming up to the northeast corner of Howth’s peninsula

This stony looking outcrop just north of the Head of Howth is called Ireland's Eye

This stony looking outcrop just north of the Head of Howth is called Ireland’s Eye

And this is coming back down into the village of Howth from the other side (notice part of the harbour area off in the distance to the right of the picture)

And this is coming back down into the village of Howth from the other side (notice part of the harbour area off in the distance to the right of the picture)

I was planning in having a good nose around the town of Howth too, which looks lovely, but by the time I got there I was fairly knackered and the thunderstorm clouds brought on by this wonderfully warm summer weather were gathering (I was back in Dalkey by the time the storm broke yesterday evening—with fabulous lightening flashes and thunder-rolls—eating supper and watching the second part of a really good documentary on Woody Allen on the BBC). So all I did was walk across the harbour area (not going up into the town center), and here be the snaps I snapped as I went my weary way. . .

The sea wall protecting Howth harbour

The sea wall protecting Howth harbour

The clubhouse of the sailing club in Howth (which is the finest looking sailing clubhouse I've seen, in Ireland anyway; I just love that blue and white stripped canopy and gallery area)

The clubhouse of the sailing club in Howth (which is the finest looking sailing clubhouse I’ve seen, in Ireland anyway; I just love that blue and white stripped canopy and gallery area)

Lots of yachts in Howth (not as many as Kinsale or Dun Laoghaire) but Howth is a full-on working port as well with a sizable fishing fleet and waterfront warehouses for doing stuff with fish when landed and servicing the fleet and so on

Lots of yachts in Howth (not as many as Kinsale or Dun Laoghaire) but Howth is a full-on working port as well with a sizable fishing fleet and waterfront warehouses for doing stuff with fish when landed and servicing the fleet and so on

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