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IMG_2830BOOKS I’ve read in 2014 (some of which, for one reason and/or another, are re-reads); and, of course, academic reading not included (just because college-course reading is rarely full-book reading, mostly only dipping in and out of things in a search for what one wants/needs, quote-mining and the like) — only books which I went into a bookstore and bought are listed here, or borrowed from the local public library (or from the college library and read for pleasure/entertainment), or picked up from a bookshelf at home or at a friend’s place.

I’m struck by how few there are, by the by; I’m sure I used to read at least twice as much just a few years ago (more than twice); nowadays I spend far, far more time website-surfacing than I do reading printed books; indeed, so much so, I could flip it and say I’m struck by how many there are!!

King's revengeThe King’s Revenge, by Don Jordan and Michael Walsh [about the hunting down and killing of the parliamentary regicides upon the restoration of the monarchy in England in 1660; for more on which, see here]

Writers and Politics, essays by Conor Cruise O’Brien.

The Bend for Home, by Dermot Healy [for more on which, see here]

The Ghost, by Robert Harris.

The Fear Index, by Robert Harris.

Jon SwiftNW, by Zadie Smith.

All Roads lead to France, by Matthew Hollis [about the last years of tortured WWI war-poet Edward Thomas, the best book I’ve read this year, I feel (for more on which, see here), this and the books by the excellent literary critic James Wood; Selina Guinness’ book first class too, and Vikram Chandra’s — see below]

The Fun Stuff, by James Wood.

How Fiction Works, by James Wood.

Wolf Hall (again, 3rd reading), by Hilary Mantell.

Perilous questionJonathan Swift, by Victoria Glendenning.

Perilous Question [about the battle for the Great Reform Bill in Britain in the early 1830s], by Antonia Frazer [for more on which, see here]

Crocodile by the Door, by Selina Guinness.

Geek Sublime, Vikram Chandra [for more on which, see here]

Hack Attack, by Nick Davies [for more on which, see here]

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